Asparagus

Asparagus

Scientific Name – Asparagus officinalis

Nutrition Facts

Amount Per 100 grams.
CategoryAmount
Calories20
Total Fat0.1 g
Saturated fat0 g
Polyunsaturated fat0.1 g
Monounsaturated fat0 g
Cholesterol0 mg
Sodium2 mg
Potassium202 mg
Total Carbohydrate3.9 g
Dietary fiber2.1 g
Sugar1.9 g
Protein2.2 g
Vitamin A15%
Vitamin B-65%
Vitamin B-120%
Vitamin C9%
Vitamin D0%
Calcium2%
Iron11%
Magnesium3%

Asparagus’s Facts

LOADED WITH NUTRIENTS

Asparagus is a very good source of fiber, folate, vitamins A, C, E and K, as well as chromium, a trace mineral that enhances the ability of insulin to transport glucose from the bloodstream into cells.

CAN HELP FIGHT CANCER

This herbaceous plant—along with avocado, kale and Brussels sprouts—is a particularly rich source of glutathione, a detoxifying compound that helps break down carcinogens and other harmful compounds like free radicals. This is why eating asparagus may help protect against and fight certain forms of cancer, such as bone, breast, colon, larynx and lung cancers.

IT IS PACKED WITH ANTIOXIDANTS

It’s one of the top-ranked fruits and vegetables for its ability to neutralize cell-damaging free radicals. This, according to preliminary research, may help slow the aging process.

LOWERS RISK OF DEPRESSION

Folate may help ward off depression by preventing an excess of homocysteine from forming in the body, which can block blood and other nutrients from reaching the brain. Excess homocysteine interferes with the production of the feel-good hormones serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine, which regulate not only mood but sleep and appetite as well.

ASPARAGUS IS A BRAIN BOOSTER

Another anti-aging property of this delicious spring veggie is that it may help our brains fight cognitive decline. Like leafy greens, asparagus delivers folate, which works with vitamin B12—found in fish, poultry, meat, and dairy—to help prevent cognitive impairment. In a study from Tufts University, older adults with healthy levels of folate and B12 performed better on a test of response speed and mental flexibility. (If you’re 50-plus, be sure you’re getting enough B12: your ability to absorb it decreases with age.)

IMPROVES HEART HEALTH

Asparagus 1 gram of soluble fiber per cup, which lowers the risk of heart disease, and the amino acid asparagine helps to flush your body of excess salt. Lastly, asparagus has excellent anti-inflammatory effects and high levels of antioxidants, both of which may help reduce the risk of heart disease.

SKIN BENEFITS FROM ASPARAGUS

Yet another amazing thing about the antioxidant glutathione: it helps protect the skin from sun damage and pollution.

HELPS FROM TUBERCULOSIS

Asparagus racemosus is also known for its effectiveness in curing bronchitis and tuberculosis. It improves the efficiency of the functioning of lung tissues and helps in treating throat infections as well.

PREGNANCY HEALTH

It is noted, asparagus has a significant amount of folate, which is important for women of childbearing age to consume daily. Folate can decrease the risk of neural-tube defects in fetuses, so it is essential that mothers-to-be get enough of it.

DIGESTIVE HEALTH

Asparagus is known to help stabilize digestion due to the high amount of fiber and protein that it contains. Both help move food through the gut and provide relief from discomfort during digestion. Asparagus also contains inulin, a unique dietary fiber associated with improved digestion. Inulin is prebiotic; it does not get broken down and digested until it reaches the large intestine. There, it nurtures bacteria known to improve nutrient absorption, decrease allergies and reduce the risk of colon cancer.

NATURAL DIURETIC

It contains high levels of the amino acid asparagine, which serves as a natural diuretic, and increased urination not only releases fluid but helps rid the body of excess salts. This is especially beneficial for people who suffer from edema (an accumulation of fluids in the body’s tissues) and those who have high blood pressure or other heart-related diseases.

HELPS TO PREVENT OSTEOPOROSIS

Poor vitamin K intake is linked with a high risk of bone fracture. Just one cup of asparagus provides 70% of your vitamin K needs for the day. Consuming an adequate amount of vitamin K daily improves bone health by improving calcium absorption and reducing urinary excretion of calcium. The iron in asparagus also plays a crucial role in maintaining the strength and elasticity of bones and joints.

IT CAN HELP YOU MEET YOUR WEIGHT-LOSS GOALS

Not only is asparagus low in fat and calories (one cup sets you back a mere 32 calories), but it also contains lots of soluble and insoluble fiber, making it a good choice if you’re trying to lose weight. Because your body digests fiber slowly, it keeps you feeling full in between meals. To maximize the veggie’s calorie-torching potential, pair it with a hard-boiled egg: the combination of fiber-rich asparagus with the egg’s protein will leave you feeling satisfied.

HELPS TO STRENGTHEN IMMUNITY SYSTEM

Asparagus is also a source of vitamin E, another important antioxidant. This vitamin helps strengthen your immune system and protects cells from the harmful effects of free radicals. To fill up on its benefits, roast asparagus with a little olive oil.

BEATS BLOATING

When it comes to fighting bloat, asparagus packs a mean punch. The veggie helps promote overall digestive health (another benefit of all that soluble and insoluble fiber!). And thanks to prebiotics—carbohydrates that can’t be digested and help encourage a healthy balance of good bacteria, or probiotics, in your digestive track—it can also reduce gas. Plus, as a natural diuretic, asparagus helps flush excess liquid, combating belly bulge.

IT’S FILLED WITH VITAMIN K

Along with other green, leafy vegetables, asparagus is a good source of vitamin K. The vitamin is crucial for coagulation (which helps your body stop bleeding after a cut) as well as bone health.

BOOSTS YOUR MOOD

Asparagus is full of folate, a B vitamin that could lift your spirits and help ward off irritability. Researchers have found a connection between low levels of folate and vitamin B12 in people who are suffering from depression, leading some docs to prescribe daily doses of both vitamins to patients with depression. Asparagus also contains high levels of tryptophan, an amino acid that has been similarly linked to improved mood.

IT IS VERY USEFUL TO FIGHT EPILEPSY

Epilepsy is a chronic disorder that affects the brain and leads to recurrent convulsions or seizures. The brain transmits abnormal signals as a result of irreversible changes in the brain tissues. The roots of asparagus racemosus can be used as an anti-epileptic and helps in curing the symptoms of epilepsy.

CAN EASE A HANGOVER

If you crave a greasy breakfast the morning after too many drinks, research suggests that a side of asparagus might be the better choice. The minerals and amino acids in asparagus extract may help ease hangovers and protect liver cells from the toxins in alcohol.

MAY HELP YOU GET IN THE MOOD

You may want to consider adding asparagus to your next date night menu: the veggie is a natural aphrodisiac thanks to vitamin B6 and folate, which can help boost feelings of arousal. Plus, vitamin E stimulates sex hormones, including estrogen in women and testosterone in men.

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